Friday, May 13, 2011

From A to Z: What's wrong with Obama's birth certificate?


Examine for yourself mounting evidence that president's document isn't genuine

© 2011 WorldNetDaily

After years of stonewalling and fighting in court to keep his long-form birth certificate under wraps, President Barack Obama has publicized an image of the document he claims should resolve his birthplace once and for all.

But is it the real deal?

In his speech announcing the birth certificate's release, Obama quickly tried to silence critical analysis of document:

"I know that there's going to be a segment of people for which, no matter what we put out, this issue will not be put to rest, but I'm speaking to the vast majority of the American people," Obama said. "We do not have time for this kind of silliness."

But Joseph Farah, editor and chief executive officer of WND, the only news agency that has waged a relentless investigative campaign on questions swirling around Obama's constitutional eligibility, warns those questions shouldn't be dismissed so quickly.

"The news media and the political establishment were quick to rush to judgment regarding Obama's eligibility in 2008, without any basis," Farah said. "It would be a big mistake for everyone to jump to a conclusion now based on the release of this document, which raises as many questions as it answers."

Jerome Corsi's new book, "Where's the Birth Certificate?," is now available for immediate shipping, autographed by the author, only from the WND Superstore.

Some of those questions have already been resolved – such as rumors WND debunked claiming the name of the hospital on the document was fictitious – while others present significant challenges to accepting the birth certificate's validity.

Notably, a growing list of graphic artists and computer experts have examined the online birth certificate and have concluded the image has been altered.

For example, Karl Denninger, the former CEO of MCSNet, a Chicago networking and Internet company, who also told WND he voted for Obama, demonstrates "kerning" on the birth certificate, a lining up of letters routinely done by computers but impossible on typewriters of the 1960s, implying the document was computer generated, not photocopied.

Denninger explains that in the image above, of the name of the hospital, the "a" and the "p" share vertical space on the line, an example of "kerning," which only modern computers can do.

Denninger's work follows the opinion from another analyst, Ivan Zatkovich of Tampa-based eComp Consultants, which consults on intellectual property for telecommunications, Web publishing and e-commerce. Zatkovich has 28 years experience in computer science and document management and for more than 10 years has been an expert witness in federal court in both criminal and civil litigation.

Zatkovich's analysis of layers in the PDF file, while dispelling some purported anomalies on the document, nonetheless confirms others, leading him to the conclusion, "The content clearly indicates that the document was knowingly and explicitly edited and modified before it was placed on the web."

And KJCT-TV of Grand Junction, Colo., reported the opinion of graphic artist James Colby, who said, "There is no doubt it has been edited and quite significantly."

Several other factors bring the birth document's authenticity into question:

  • The objectivity of "experts" cited by the mainstream media to verify the birth certificate is suspect, including that of Fox News Channel's Jean-Claude Tremblay, who assured America they "should not be suspicious" of the document, but who, WND discovered, had heralded Obama's election victory in an online post.

  • Obama's posted birth certificate contains the same anomalies as a well-known forgery that claimed he was born in Kenya, suggesting the anomalous markings came from the same source. "How could Obama's 'real' birth certificate share these unique characteristics with an obvious forgery?" asks Farah. "For the life of me, I can't figure out an answer other than they were created by the same person or persons."

  • The birth certificate's reported delivering physician, Dr. David Sinclair, differs from previously published reports and even the myth-busting's original entry, which named Dr. Rodney T. West as the doctor of record.

  • Obama's purported birth certificate contains over a dozen differences in form from the verified, Hawaii copy of the birth certificate issued to the Nordyke twins, born the next day at the same reported hospital.

  • Another YouTube participant, 37, who identifies himself as orangegold1 and a computer image expert, posted a video trying to persuade watchers that the White House either was ignorant in scanning and posting a document, or was submarined by someone inside the walls who wanted people to be suspicious of the document:

    His concerns rest with the layers that are in the document, and he claimed some of the images on the document actually were added via computer.

    "I do this for a living," he said, adding that the document is "obviously faked."

  • The local registrar listed in the Nordyke twins' birth certificate is notably different than the local registrar on the Obama birth certificate.

Birth certificate of Gretchen Nordyke, one of two twin sisters born at what was known in 1961 as the Kapiolani Maternity & Gynecological Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii.

In addition, the website notes several additional irregularities with the Obama birth certificate that do not appear on the Nordyke twin's birth certificates:

  • In Box 3, "This Birth," there are two "Xs" above "Twin" and "Triplet" – why are these "Xs" here and what do they signify?

  • What is the meaning of the smudges in the Obama birth certificate in the box containing the name of the attending physician?

  • What is the significance of the numbers, seen vertically, on the right side of the Obama birth certificate?

Hawaii officials say they have Obama's original birth certificate and made copies for the president. One of the copies then was scanned and posted on the White House website.

But Denninger is among those who say there are still too many questions to simply examine an online image.

He contends, "There's only one way we're going to get the truth – a forensic document examiner is going to have to go look at the certificate and authenticate it. The real one – not a printout."

The White House had trumpeted the release of the document, calling it "proof positive" Obama was born in Hawaii, as if that would answer all of the questions about his presidential eligibility.

But even if Obama's Hawaiian birth were proven and verified, many contend the country's founders understood a "natural born Citizen" – as listed by the Article 2, Section 1, of the U.S. Constitution as a requirement to hold the office of president – to be a person born of two American parents.

Barack Obama Sr., who is listed as the father, was not a U.S. citizen.

The president himself even seemed to acknowledge the relevance of parental citizenship when he co-sponsored a resolution to address Sen. John McCain's presidential eligibility that implied a "natural born Citizen" must be born to "American citizen" parents.

"You may have thought Barack Obama ended the eligibility debate, and certainly the birth certificate debate," said Farah, "with his release of what purports to be his long-awaited, long-form document.

"But it's not over," he added. "Not by a long shot."

WND Editor Joseph Farah is available to discuss today's breaking stories on eligibility. Contact

Read more: From A to Z: What's wrong with Obama's birth certificate?

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